Capital Jewish Museum

For 60 years as the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington, we collected & shared stories about the unique nature of Jewish life in our nation’s capital – a history that is local, national, & international. For the next 40 years, the synagogue served as the centerpiece of all of our activities including an expanding archival collection, exhibitions, educational programs, and neighborhood walking tours. In 2018, the JHSGW adopted our new name — Lillian & Albert Small Capital Jewish Museum — as we prepare to build and launch a new public museum.

The new Capital Jewish Museum will inspire visitors to connect, reflect and act: connect across families and diverse communities, reflect on the relevance of the past to today, and act on behalf of their communities and values. The Capital Jewish Museum, officially the Lillian & Albert Small Capital Jewish Museum, is a historical society and its planned museum in Washington, D.C., focused on the history of Jewish life in the American capital city and the surrounding Washington metropolitan area For 60 years as the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Washington, we collected & shared stories about the unique nature of Jewish life in our nation’s capital – a history that is local, national, & international. In 1969, we saved the city’s oldest synagogue building by moving it three blocks from its original site in the heart of the historic Jewish neighborhood to the corner of Third & G Streets, NW. Community contributions and a gift from Lillian & Albert Small helped restore the synagogue, which is listed on the National Register for Historic Places.

For the next 40 years, the synagogue served as the centerpiece of all of our activities including an expanding archival collection, exhibitions, educational programs, and neighborhood walking tours. In 2018, the JHSGW adopted our new name — Lillian & Albert Small Capital Jewish Museum — as we prepare to build and launch a new public museum. As part of the Capitol Crossing development project, in 2016 the historic synagogue was moved 50 feet into the middle of Third Street. The synagogue moved for its third and final time in 2019 to the corner of Third & F Streets, where it will become the heart of the new museum, a witness and active participant in its ever-changing neighborhood.

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  • Saturday09:00 - 17:00
  • Sunday09:00 - 17:00
  • Monday09:00 - 17:00
  • Tuesday09:00 - 17:00
  • Wednesday09:00 - 17:00
  • Thursday09:00 - 17:00
  • Friday09:00 - 17:00
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