Tate Modern

Tate Modern is a modern art gallery located in London. It is Britain’s national gallery of international modern art and forms part of the Tate group. It is based in the former Bankside Power Station, in the Bankside area of the London Borough of Southwark. When Tate first opened its doors to the public in 1897 it had just one site, displaying a small collection of British artworks. Today we have four major sites and the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day and international modern and contemporary art, which includes nearly 70,000 artworks.

Henry Tate

In 1889 Henry Tate, an industrialist who had made his fortune as a sugar refiner, offered his collection of British nineteenth-century art to the nation and provided funding for the first Tate Gallery.

Tate was a great patron of Pre-Raphaelite artists and his bequest of 65 paintings to the National Gallery included John Everett Millais’ Ophelia 1851–2 and J.W.Waterhouse’s The Lady of Shalott 1888. The bequest was turned down by the trustees because there was not enough space in the gallery.

A campaign was begun to create a new gallery dedicated to British art. With the help of an £80,000 donation from Tate himself, the gallery at Millbank, now known as Tate Britain, was built and opened in 1897. Tate’s original bequest of works, together with works from the National Gallery, formed the founding collection.

Henry Tate and Slavery

Over the years there has been much debate about Henry Tate’s association with slavery. As we reflect on this important question, we have invited the historical researchers at the Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slave-ownership at University College London to share their analysis. We have worked with them on a statement regarding what we know about the historical facts and some of the questions which remain unanswered.

 

There are twelve parking spaces for disabled visitors, accessed via Park Street. Please book these spaces at least 24 hours in advance.

To book accessible parking:

  • Call +44 (0)20 7887 8888 – option 1 (daily 10.30–17.00)
  • Our phone line supports the use of speech recognition apps
Your name, contact details, vehicle registration number, date and time of visit are required to make the booking for an accessible parking space

Once you have parked, enter via the South Entrance of the Blavatnik Building across the level terrace, approximately 30 – 60 meters from the parking spaces.

Two RADAR Key operated lifts link the South Entrance on Level 1 and the Ticket desks in the Turbine Hall. RADAR keys are available from staff at the South Entrance on Level 1 and ticket desks on Level 0. If you have booked a mobility scooter or wheelchair, these can also be collected from the South Entrance.

 

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